Prediction Patterns

To create a publication pattern for automatic prediction, you can use a publication pattern template, or you can specify the enumeration, chronology, frequency, and regularity for the serial title in the serial holdings record.

Creating a Prediction Pattern Without Using a Template

 

From the main SHR display, click the icon in the lower right that looks like a piece of paper.  This will open the Create Publication Patterns window.

There are four screens to fill out to create the publication pattern.

  1. Pattern Options

  2. Enumeration and Chronology

  3. Regularity Pattern

  4. Prediction Results

Fields in the Pattern Options form:

  • Fill out the start date from the issue you have in hand.

  • The “arrival pattern” section is used to determine when an issue is predicted to arrive versus its stated publication date.

  • If issues will be barcoded and added to the catalog, check the “Generate items at check-in” and “Prompt for barcode” boxes.

  • If you are using a serial template with the price in it, you don’t need to fill out the price on this screen.

  • Fill in the number of issues to predict. Generally, you don’t want to produce more than a year’s worth of issues at a time. More predicted issues can be generated at the check-in screen.

 

Click the “Next” button to move to the enumeration and chronology screen.

The Enumeration and Chronology screen is where you choose the frequency of the predictions, and setup how the enumeration and chronology is displayed. 

 

Fill out the following fields in this form:

  • Frequency

  • Start Date

  • Chronology Setup - use the drop down boxes to select which information you would like displayed in the chronology. You can specify up to four levels of chronology.

    • Caption - Select the chronology caption in the Caption box.

    • Format - Select the format in the Format box.

    • Click Add to add the chronology level.

    • Continue adding chronology levels.
       

Example:
If the chronology includes a year, month, and day (January 1 2018), there are three levels of chronology. Select Year as the caption and select Number as the format for the first level of chronology. Select Day of Month as the caption and select Number as the format for the second level of chronology. Select Month as the caption and select Abbreviation as the format for the third level of chronology

Text items such as days of the week and months should use the format “abbreviation”.

Information should be added to the chronology section in the following order:  year, day, month.

This is an example of correctly formatted chronology and how it would be displayed in the catalog:

 

(Jan. 1 2018)

 

Click the “Next” button to move to the “Regularity Pattern” screen.

The Regularity pattern is where you can modify the predicted issues to take into account combined, omitted, or extra issues.  The information on the right side of the window gives the number codes that are used in the “From” and “To” boxes.  The “Calendar Change” section is used to set a specific date for the volume information to advance, rather than relying on the number of issues that have been received.

 

Add, combine, and omit issues as necessary to match the publication schedule listed in the magazine you are working with.  Also, enter in calendar change information if necessary.

 

Click the “Next” button to go to the “Prediction Results” screen.

The Prediction Results screen shows exactly what issues are predicted, how they will be displayed in the catalog, and when they are expected to arrive.  At the bottom of the window you can choose how many issues you want to predict. 

 

Click the “Finish” button to complete the process of creating the prediction.

Creating a Prediction Pattern Using Templates

 

From the Serials menu, select Templates, and select Publication Patterns.

This brings up the Publication Pattern Template Manager. Change the Creator to <All> to see all the Publication Pattern Templates.

You can sort these templates by Frequency. You can then select a template, do a right-click, and select Create. You can then work through the screens and make any needed modifications. At the last screen, you can name it.

 

You could make generic templates that staff at your library can use. For example: Weekly/Biweekly, Monthly/Bimonthly, Quarterly, Seasonal, etc.

 

Once the templates have been created you can create a new SHR and use the templates that will appear at the bottom of the Pattern Options Screen.

 

Using the information from the issue in hand, you can then modify the prediction pattern as you create the SHR.

 

Creating a Blank Template

 

Prediction patterns have advantages and disadvantages. Ideally, after creating a pattern your issues will be accurately predicted for you, which can make the check-in process quicker and more efficient. Unfortunately, prediction patterns are time consuming to set up and to keep accurate, especially when publishers don’t follow their own publication schedules. Creating a blank pattern is an alternative to standard predictions where issue information is entered when the issue is received at check-in as opposed to having them predicted ahead of time.  While this can be slightly more time consuming at check-in, this method requires no maintenance of prediction patterns.

 

You can create four templates to cover the majority of publication frequencies.  The four templates include:

            A monthly/bimonthly template

            A weekly/biweekly template

            A seasonal template

            A quarterly template

Starting from the enumeration and chronology screen, set the frequency to “Completely Irregular” to avoid the prediction of individual issues.

 

Setup the chronology section as appropriate for the publication frequency you are working with and move on to the enumeration section. The screenshot above shows how the chronology is set up for a monthly/bimonthly template.  Issues are combined at check-in to create a bimonthly issue.  The same is true for biweekly versus weekly issues.

 

In the caption box type, [Free Text] and in the format drop down box select “Free Text”.  This will allow you to type in your own enumeration at check in. Text within brackets is not displayed at check-in.

 

Click the “Next” button to move on to the regularity pattern screen, which should be blank.

Click “Next” again and a window will pop up which says, “No issues or parts will be predicted because this frequency requires publication details”.

Individual predictions are not necessary, so click “OK” to move on to the next screen.

The “Prediction Results” screen will also be blank.  Place a checkmark in, “Save as Template,” type in the name you want for your template, and click “Finish” to create the blank template.

 

Supplements

 

A title that has supplements as part of its subscription will need a second publication pattern. From the title’s SHR screen, click on the Publication Pattern piece of paper to create a new pattern.

 

On the Pattern Options screen, change the Category to “Supplementary Material.”

If you created blank templates, select the one most appropriate for the title.

 

If you didn’t create blank templates, click on Next to move to the Enumeration and Chronology screen.

 

  • Change the Frequency to “Completely Irregular.”

 

  • Setup the chronology section as it matches the supplement in hand.

 

In the enumeration section, in the caption box type, [Free Text] and in the format drop down box select “Free Text”. This will allow you to type in the name of the supplement at check in. Text within brackets is not displayed at check-in.

Click the “Next” button to move on to the regularity pattern screen, which should be blank.

 

Click “Next” again and a window will pop up which says, “No issues or parts will be predicted because this frequency requires publication details”.  Individual predictions are not necessary, so click “OK” to move on to the next screen.

 

The “Prediction Results” screen will also be blank. Click on “Finish.”

For more information on creating a prediction pattern with enumeration see: Creating a Publication Pattern.

Kathy Schmidt

4/8/2018